The Search for Emotional Intelligence (E.Q.)

 

The global workforce is continuously changing. Managers and entrepreneurs are finding it harder and harder to find the right candidates for their roles. Normally, when searching for a new employee, they look at candidates’ skills, prior experience and professional goals. Of course these are important factors that need to be taken into account, but it somehow makes managers forget about a key ability which is quintessential to a successful hiring: emotional intelligence (EQ).

In order to understand how overlooked this factor is, you should know that many job descriptions do not even list this ability as one of the reasons for a successful candidacy. Building a team of emotionally intelligent people can have a positive effect on the company’s performance.

What is emotional intelligence? There are many interpretations surrounding this phrase, but how exactly can we define it? Psychology Today defines it as: “the ability to identify and manage your own emotions and the emotions of others.” In other words, a person is considered to have a strong emotional intelligence when they are able to keep their emotions in check, whilst also empathising with coworkers and understanding why and how their feelings can impact the quality of their work.

People with high emotional intelligence are more capable of working in teams, are more flexible and they adjust easily to change. A person with a high level of EQ is more likely to succeed than one with degrees and qualifications who lacks EQ.

 

But how can we find emotionally intelligent employees? Here a few tips and tricks in order to identify them easier:

 

  1. Enquiries about past actions and professional relationships

During the interview, the recruiter can ask how well the candidate interacted with his former co-workers, if they got on well. This is where recruiters should be able to find out how in touch with their emotions the candidates really are and whether they are capable of describing them. The answers received during these questions offer you a good start regarding candidates’ emotional abilities.

  1. Hypothetical scenarios

To get even more in-depth information about the candidate, present them with a hypothetical situation like this one: “A client is mad due to a delivery mix-up and your company is not at fault. How would you deal with that situation?” EQ people will always remain calm and will try to figure out what happened to the client and try and sort things out in a calm and polite manner.

  1. Candidate self-awareness analysis

Candidates with a strong sense of self-awareness can easily detect their own strengths and weaknesses and how their actions can influence or affect others. Self-awareness also goes hand-in-hand when a person learns a lesson through constructive criticism. People such as this can also control their emotions when the situation asks for it. They understand, but don’t let anything control their actions. Candidates with a high level of EQ do not require motivation, because they are self-motivated. Even when disappointment occurs, they pick themselves up quite fast given their inner ambition. Last but not least, these type of people can easily trust and work within a new team. They do not favour backstabbing and avoid power struggles at all costs.

In their search for EQ people, many companies have started using behavioural assessments and analysing their internal data. Although the tactics mentioned above are great, you may be surprised, but you can find the necessary emotionally intelligent people in your organisation. Besides the usual qualities required for a successful employee, some recruiters consider emotional intelligence to be a hassle in their search, but it is worth the extra work. Having more and more people with a high level of EQ can radically transform the workplace, given the fact that your employees will be more engaged and committed to steer the organisation into the right direction.

Great People Inside provides easy-to-use tools and processes to attract, assess, match, select, onboard, manage, develop, benchmark and maintain workforces anywhere in the world.

Finding the right talent, the best fit for the job and your organisation, can be a very challenging task. It requires deep knowledge of your own organisation’s culture and keen understanding of the candidate’s personality, strengths, interests, work style and other characteristics. Our technology and solutions will do the work for you, helping you find employees who can flourish and reach the highest performance required to constantly bring your company forward.

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Sources:

Entrepreneur.com

FastCompany.com

Discovering the Millennial Mindset of 2017

 

There are many things that have been said about Millennials these days and not all of them are good things. As a group, they are being viewed as lazy, entitled, impatient and disloyal due to their lack of continuous activity at one particular job. Every company wants to understand them better, because they stand as a group that is also looking for a good balance between work and personal life, feedback and they do not shy away from a smaller salary as long as they have a proper work environment.

But having a good work environment isn’t everything for millennials. They are looking for wellbeing programs whilst also developing a purposeful life and being active throughout. Given the fact that they practically grew up alongside the technological boom, engagement at work is something they are struggling with.

Today’s business environment isn’t prepared for this generation and vice versa. Millennials lack in social skills due to the fact that they are always “online” and this makes it difficult for companies to fully grasp their needs and desires. Although there are apps and tools that help people connect with one another, that allow them to easily share information of any kind, too much connectivity is actually killing connectivity.

People have stopped interacting face-to-face and it’s absolutely vital that real human contact is brought back into our society. Unfortunately, for large organisations, big events are not at all effective; when you are gathering over 100 people in the same place, obviously people will interact with their usual acquaintances.

Millennials are also not rushing into marriage and do not show the same level of commitment in their respective communities, whilst they also distance themselves from political and religious affiliations. A study done by Gallup has uncovered the fact that close to 44% of millennials interviewed, declared to be politically independent in comparison to people from generation X, baby boomers and traditionalists with 37%, 32% and 26% respectively.

Simply embracing ideas, principles and values is not the “millennial way”. This happens because they are connected with everything that happens in the world around them. and they are exposed to a huge array of different opinions and ideas.  As mentioned earlier in the article, millennials are connected 24/7 to the internet and have instant access to anything ranging from news and political debates to entertainment and comedy shows. The same study done by Gallup revealed that a whopping 91% of millennials possess a smartphone and 71% of them use the internet for information and news. That is how millennials build their unique viewpoint on a global scale, thus making them intriguing to observe, specifically the way in which they buy, communicate, work and interact.

The “usual” workplace mindset is not something they relate to. Millennials are looking for a more personal approach from their managers in terms of their relationship. The aforementioned study, noticed that 62% of millennials that manage to speak with their managers about non-related work issues see themselves working for that company a year from now.

Given the fact that millennials are keen on company values, they wish to see a change in behaviour reflected in community and/or society programs. In a study conducted by Deloitte for 2017, it was revealed that 62% of millennials want to see business leaders devoted to improving society, this representing a 9% increase from 2015. Furthermore, 65% think that companies are acting in a more ethical manner, corroborated with a 16% decrease in criticism, in regards to 2015, in relation to business activities.

Millennials wish to see businesses involved in projects that focus on economic, environmental and social issues that concern our days. To be more precise, they wish to see organisations address problems regarding: cyber-security, economic stability, health care, unemployment, climate change and education.

In conclusion, although millennials appear to be fussy and disinterested, they value a strong work and business ethic and given their moral compass, they want a continuous development of society in order to ensure a meaningful and enjoyable existence/life for everyone around the world.

 

Sources:

http://www.gallup.com/businessjournal/191435/millennials-work-life.aspx

www.blog.hrweekly.com

The 2017 Deloitte Millennial Survey:
Apprehensive millennials:
seeking stability and opportunities
in an uncertain world

The Effectiveness of High-Potential Employee Programs

High-potential (HIPO) employees find themselves in the top 5% within an organisation, based on their individual performances. They are considered the company’s most prized assets and are being tipped-off to go into leadership positions. But this is easier said than done. In most cases, organisations develop HIPO programs in order to train their best employees in becoming future leaders.

Although high-potential employee programs might seem like the perfect solution, over 40% of the people participating do not belong there, according to the data analysed by the Harvard Business Review (HBR). The information gathered by HBR consists of 1,964 high potential employees, from 3 distinct companies, who have measured their leadership abilities through 360° assessments. Feedback is immediate, with analysis reports being developed almost instantly. This type of assessment is done when organisations wish to measure capabilities such as low turnover, employee engagement and high productivity. Obviously, the better the score, the better the outcome.

When looking at the data gathered from the participants in the HIPO programs, the results were outlandish. 12% of them found themselves in the lowest quadrant in leadership effectiveness; resulting in an overall 42% below average. They’re not in the top 5% anymore, not by a mile.

What about the quality of the HIPO programs that are running in your company? There are a couple of mistakes that may come along the way in regards to these programs:

  1. Performance doesn’t equal potential: HIPO programs tend to focus too much on performance and that generally leads to problems in today’s ever changing business climate. First of all, most companies do not know how to measure performance given the fact that if subjective ratings are eliminated, there are very few metrics left to count on. Secondly, even if the right parameters are chosen to measure performance, most top performers cannot handle or are simply not prepared for the next level. The transition from being a simple employee to a manager, or from a manager to a leader, requires abilities most people haven’t been trained for before. Plus, there is always the possibility that HIPO employees focus on solving problems or an all-round team player. Unfortunately, this leads to people placed in jobs they are not able or do not want to perform. It is absolutely vital to understand that performance represents what you do and potential is simply what you COULD do. If you are really good at doing X this doesn’t mean you will be great at doing Y – X and Y here being two distinct activities.
  2. HIPO’s have their weaknesses: Here, the Pareto principle fits the bill quite perfectly. If you don’t know what the Pareto principle is, here is the explanation: 20% of employees make up for 80% of the company’s revenues and profits. Based on this idea, it is clear that 20% of employees cause 80% of the problems within an organisation. Coincidentally or not, they are most often than not, the same employees. HIPO personnel, who generally know their worth, are frequently more difficult to manage. Nevertheless, no matter how astute these people are, they tend to have a dark side as well. In this scenario, the HR department has to intervene. Unfortunately, when it does intervene, the focus is on improving their existing qualities which leaves out their other personality problems to roam free. Overworked strengths have a tendency to become weaknesses and that is not good news for any organisation.

It is a well-known fact that a top performer may start having difficulties at his job when he is placed in a leadership role. It is clear he may perform well in one company but he cannot have the same impact and results in another organisation. It all depends on his vision and leadership, and these qualities are not easy to find.

Great People Inside provides easy-to-use tools and processes to attract, assess, match, select, onboard, manage, develop, benchmark and maintain workforces anywhere in the world.

We help you find the right talent, the best fit for the job and your organisation. It requires deep knowledge of your own organisation’s culture and keen understanding of the candidate’s personality, strengths, interests, work style and other characteristics. The GR8 360° tool is excellent at developing managerial competencies, skills and behaviours. When using this assessment, you will find over 50 dimensions that come along with suggestions for future improvement and development. Our technology and solutions will do the work for you, helping you find employees who can flourish and reach the highest performance required to constantly bring your company forward.

 

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Sources:

www.hbr.org

www.dcebglobal.com

www.forbes.com